LNG dredger for DEME

01 Mar 2017
Artists impression of Spartacus which will be delivered in 2019

Artists impression of Spartacus which will be delivered in 2019

A new LNG-powered Cutter Suction Dreger is set to join the DEME fleet and will be built at Royal IHC in the Netherlands.

Spartacus will have a total installed capacity of 44.180kw which will enable it to cut harder soils at speeds which DEME says have not been previously possible.

Jan Gabriel, DEME’s head of construction and conversion, said: “This cutter suction dredger is going to be an important benchmark for the industry and a huge step towards limiting the environmental impact of our vessels.”

It will also have other new green innovations onboard including a waste heat recovery system that converts heat from the exhaust gasses to electrical energy.

Spartacus follows the order of LNG-powered Trailing Suction Hopper Dredgers Minerva and Scheldt River, the new order will have a Green Passport and Clean Design notation.

Dave Vander Heyde, ICH’s CEO, said: “We can state that this CSD is the largest and most complex that IHC has ever built. The combination of power, size and innovations makes it a true challenge to build.”

He added: “We also want to thank DEME for giving us the opportunity to build the world’s first LNG-powered cutter suction dredger.”

Alongside this, DEME has also ordered a next generation offshore installation vessel which will be built at COSCO in China and delivered in 2019.

Orion will be deployed by DEME’s subsidiary GeoSea for the construction of offshore wind farms to service the oil and gas industry as well as for the decommissioning of offshore installations.

It has dual fuel engines and can run on LNG, like Spartacus it will have a Green Passport and Clean Design notation.

Luc Vandebulckle, managing director at GeoSea, concluded: “With Orion we will be uniquely positioned to meet the future requirements of our customers and the trend towards larger capacity turbines and bigger wind farm projects, delivering energy at lower costs.”

Both Orion and Spartacus are expected to be delivered in 2019.

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